Posts Tagged Moon

The Moon’s North Pole..

The Earth’s moon has been an endless source of fascination for humanity for thousands of years. When at last Apollo 11 landed on the moon’s surface in 1969, the crew found a desolate, lifeless orb, but one which still fascinates scientist and non-scientist alike.

This image of the moon’s north polar region was taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera, or LROC. One of the primary scientific objectives of LROC is to identify regions of permanent shadow and near-permanent illumination. Since the start of the mission, LROC has acquired thousands of Wide Angle Camera images approaching the north pole. From these images, scientists produced this mosaic, which is composed of 983 images taken over a one month period during northern summer. This mosaic shows the pole when it is best illuminated, regions that are in shadow are candidates for permanent shadow. 

Image Credit: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University

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July 20, 1969. “Houston, Tranquillity Base here. The Eagle has landed.” “One small step for man, a giant leap for mankind.”

Launched from Florida on July 16, the fifth manned mission, and the third lunar mission of NASA‘sApollo program, was crewed by Commander Neil Armstrong, Command Module Pilot Michael Collins, and Lunar Module Pilot Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin, Jr. On July 20, Armstrong and Aldrin landed in the Sea of Tranquillity and on July 21 became the first humans to walk on the Moon. Their landing craftEagle, spent 21 hours and 31 minutes on the lunar surface while Collins orbited above in thecommand shipColumbia.[2] The three astronauts returned to Earth with 47.5 pounds (21.5 kg) of lunar rocks and landed in the Pacific Ocean on July 24.

Armstrong-Collins-Aldrin

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Sunrise on the Moon..

On June 10, 2011, NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter angled its orbit 65° to the west, allowing the spacecraft’s cameras to capture a dramatic sunrise view of the moon’s Tycho crater.

A very popular target with amateur astronomers, Tycho is located at 43.37°S, 348.68°E, and is about 51 miles (82 km) in diameter. The summit of the central peak is 1.24 miles (2 km) above the crater floor. The distance from Tycho’s floor to its rim is about 2.92 miles (4.7 km).

Tycho crater’s central peak complex, shown here, is about 9.3 miles (15 km) wide, left to right (southeast to northwest in this view).

Image Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/Arizona State University

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Moon Shadows..By the way, Happy Winter Solstice..

A total lunar eclipse is seen as the full moon is shadowed by the Earth on the arrival of the winter solstice, Tuesday, December 21, 2010 in Arlington, VA. The eclipse lasted about three hours and twenty-eight minutes.

A lunar eclipse occurs when the Earth lines up directly between the sun and the moon, blocking the sun’s rays and casting a shadow on the moon. As the moon moves deeper and deeper into the Earth’s shadow, the moon changes color before your very eyes, turning from gray to an orange or deep shade of red.

Image Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

Thanks to an overcast sky, I didn’t get to see the eclipse..


UPDATE:
Breitbart/Vimeo Video: LUNAR ECLIPSE TIME-LAPSE VIDEO

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